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SD Card Speed Test

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Since we first launched Raspberry Pi, an SD card (or microSD card) has always been a vital component. Without an SD card to store the operating system, Raspberry Pi is pretty useless*! Over the ensuing eight years, SD cards have become the default removable storage technology, used in cameras, smartphones, games consoles and all sorts of other devices. Prices have plummeted to the point where smaller size cards are practically given away for free, and at the same time storage capacity has increased to the point where you can store a terabyte on your thumbnail.

SD card speed ratings, and why they matter

However, the fact that SD cards are now so commonplace sometimes conceals the fact that not all SD cards are created equal. SD cards have a speed rating – how fast you can read or write data to the card – and as card sizes have increased, so have speed ratings. If you want to store 4K video from your digital camera, it is important not just that the card is big enough to hold it, but also that you can write it to the card fast enough to keep up with the huge amount of data coming out of the camera.

The speed of an SD card will also directly affect how fast your Raspberry Pi runs, in just the same way as the speed of a hard drive affects how fast a conventional desktop computer runs. The faster you can read data from the card, the faster your Raspberry Pi will boot, and the faster programs will load. Equally, write speed will also affect how well any programs which save large quantities of data run – so it’s important to use a good-quality card.

What speed can I expect from my SD card?

The speed rating of an SD card should be printed either on the card itself or on the packaging.

The 32GB card shown below is Class 4, denoted by the 4 inside the letter C – this indicates that it can write at 4MB/s.

The 64GB card shown below is Class 10, and so can write at 10MB/s. It also shows the logo of UHS (“ultra high speed”) Class 1, the 1 inside the letter U, which corresponds to the same speed.

More recently, speeds have started to be quoted in terms of the intended use of the card, with Class V10 denoting a card intended for video at 10MB/s, for example. But the most recent speed categorisation – and the one most relevant to use in a Raspberry Pi – is the new A (for “application”) speed class. We recommend the use of Class A1 cards (as the one above – see the A1 logo to the right of the Class 10 symbol) in Raspberry Pi – in addition to a write speed of 10MB/s, these support at least 1500 read operations and 500 write operations per second. All the official Raspberry Pi microSD cards we sell meet this specification.

A new tool for testing your SD card speed

We’ve all heard the stories of people who have bought a large capacity SD card at a too-good-to-be-true price from a dodgy eBay seller, and found that their card labelled as 64GB can only actually hold 2GB of data. But that is at least fairly easy to spot – it’s much harder to work out whether your supposedly fast SD card is actually meeting its specified speed, and unscrupulous manufacturers and sellers often mislabel low quality cards as having unachievable speeds.

Today, as the first part of a new suite of tests which will enable you to perform various diagnostics on your Raspberry Pi hardware, we are releasing a tool which allows you to test your SD card to check that it performs as it should.

To install the new tool, from a terminal do

sudo apt update sudo apt install agnostics

(“agnostics”? In this case it’s nothing to do with religion! I’ll leave you to work out the pun…)

Once installed, you will find the new application “Raspberry Pi Diagnostics” in the main menu under “Accessories”, and if you launch it, you’ll see a screen like this:

In future, this screen will show a list of the diagnostic tests, and you will be able to select which you want to run using the checkboxes in the right-hand column. But for now, the only test available is SD Card Speed Test; just press “Run Tests” to start it.

Understanding your speed test results

One thing to note is that the write performance of SD cards declines over time. A new card is blank and data can be written to what is effectively “empty” memory, which is fast; but as a card fills up, memory needs to be erased before it can be overwritten, and so writes will become slower the more a card is used. The pass / fail criteria in this test assume a new (or at least freshly formatted) card; don’t be alarmed if the write speed test fails when run on the SD card you’ve been using for six months! If you do notice your Raspberry Pi slowing down over time, it may be worth backing up your SD card using the SD Card Copier tool and reformatting it.

The test takes a minute or so to run on a Raspberry Pi 4 (it’ll take longer on older models), and at the end you’ll see a results screen with either (hopefully) PASS or (if you are less fortunate) FAIL. To see the detailed results of the speed test, press “Show Log”, which will open the test log file in a text editor. (The log file is also written to your home directory as rpdiags.txt.)

We are testing against the A1 specification, which requires a sequential write speed of 10MB/s, 500 random write operations per second, and 1500 random read operations per second; we run the test up to three times. (Tests of this nature are liable to errors due to other background operations accessing the SD card while the test is running, which can affect the result – by running the test multiple times we try to reduce the likelihood of a single bad run resulting in a fail.)

If the test result was a pass, great! Your SD card is good enough to provide optimum performance in your Raspberry Pi. If it failed, have a look in the log file – you’ll see something like:

Raspberry Pi Diagnostics - version 0.1 Mon Feb 24 09:44:16 2020 Test : SD Card Speed Test Run 1 prepare-file;0;0;12161;23 seq-write;0;0;4151;8 rand-4k-write;0;0;3046;761 rand-4k-read;9242;2310;0;0 Sequential write speed 4151 kb/s (target 10000) - FAIL Note that sequential write speed declines over time as a card is used - your card may require reformatting Random write speed 761 IOPS (target 500) - PASS Random read speed 2310 IOPS (target 1500) - PASS Run 2 prepare-file;0;0;8526;16 ... 

You can see just how your card compares to the stated targets; if it is pretty close to them, then your card is only just below specification and is probably fine to use. But if you are seeing significantly lower scores than the targets, you might want to consider getting another card.

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[*] unless you’re using PXE network or USB mass storage boot modes of course.

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