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Classify your trash with Raspberry Pi

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Maker Jen Fox took to hackster.io to share a Raspberry Pi–powered trash classifier that tells you whether the trash in your hand is recyclable, compostable, or just straight-up garbage.

Jen reckons this project is beginner-friendly, as you don’t need any code to train the machine learning model, just a little to load it on Raspberry Pi. It’s also a pretty affordable build, costing less than $70 including a Raspberry Pi 4.

“Haz waste”?!

Hardware:

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Model B
  • Raspberry Pi Camera Module
  • Adafruit push button
  • Adafruit LEDs
Watch Jen giving a demo of her creation

Software

The code-free machine learning model is created using Lobe, a desktop tool that automatically trains a custom image classifier based on what objects you’ve shown it.

The image classifier correctly guessing it has been shown a bottle cap

Training the image classifier

Basically, you upload a tonne of photos and tell Lobe what object each of them shows. Jen told the empty classification model which photos were of compostable waste, which were of recyclable and items, and which were of garbage or bio-hazardous waste. Of course, as Jen says, “the more photos you have, the more accurate your model is.”

Loading up Raspberry Pi

Birds eye view of Raspberry Pi 4 with a camera module connected
The Raspberry Pi Camera Module attached to Raspberry Pi 4

As promised, you only need a little bit of code to load the image classifier onto your Raspberry Pi. The Raspberry Pi Camera Module acts as the image classifier’s “eyes” so Raspberry Pi can find out what kind of trash you hold up for it.

The push button and LEDs are wired up to the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins, and they work together with the camera and light up according to what the image classifier “sees”.

Here’s the fritzing diagram showing how to wire the push button and LEDS to the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins

You’ll want to create a snazzy case so your trash classifier looks good mounted on the wall. Kate cut holes in a cardboard box to make sure that the camera could “see” out, the user can see the LEDs, and the push button is accessible. Remember to leave room for Raspberry Pi’s power supply to plug in.

Jen’s hand-painted case mounted to the wall, having a look at a plastic bag

Jen has tonnes of other projects on her Hackster profile — check out the micro:bit Magic Wand.

Website: LINK

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